GRAHAM BURCHELL

 

Late Summer Sun

 

I was a small plant once - tender,

Fresh to the thrill of white probes winning

A fumble through the wet crumble of ancestors.

 

My leaves were a flowing cut above the others,

Even though I flowered briefly

In the milky light of May’s uncertain clime.

 

Petals the colour of blued glass

Made you smile in early summers passed.

I noted your ‘heart skips’ then, 

“Ah” - short gasps rose from your lips    

As you turned, bent on full hips                                 

To see my fine erect stems                                                

And blooms in the ripeness of perfection.                             

 

 “Interesting foliage,” another said.

He has such leaves, mottled texture,

The chlorophyll dark with rich abundance.”

 

 “He’ll not flower more this season,” she scoffed.  

A breeze caught the weighty folds of her sky skirt.             

She dusted soil dried hands and never turned again         

To my mound of age grown clumsiness.

 

She looked with bitter eyes to the sun instead.

“Not this season or any of the future.

He’s used this land, drunk from it, seeded it. 

Now the soil is wrung.

 

We’re all a little tired – dulled,

But we’ll joke I guess, and drink some memories,                  

While his last flowers make fake dry fruit

Beneath the wry smiles of this late summer sun.”    

 

 

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Sentinel Poetry #33

Online Magazine Monthly, August 2005. ISSN 1479-425X. Editor: Amatoritsero Ede